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Undo's and the history panel
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Eddie Russell

Pluralsight

Eddie Russell
In this lesson, we'll learn about the importance of undos and history inside Photoshop. All right, so for this lesson, we'll be working with the project file creature_layers, if you want to open that up and follow along. So one of the main advantages to painting digitally as opposed to traditional media is the fact that it's much, much easier to make changes to a digital painting and maybe take away or remove actions that we've done as opposed to it would be for say acrylics or oil paints. If we wanted to remove paints from our canvas that we had painted with these traditional media, it could be much, much more difficult to do that. So basically, to accommodate for this type of work flow inside Photoshop, Adobe has built in history into our Photoshop file. So let me go ahead and jump over to the Layers panel. I'm going to open up our layer group for colors and select our Creature layer here. Now we'll just zoom in on his mouth here. And let's make some changes. Let me grab my Eraser tool here. And let's just come in and let's do some dental work on this guy. We'll come in here and erase some teeth. I'm going to come in and erase this tooth here. That's pretty good. And let's come in and erase this tooth here. All right. So we've taken out two of his teeth. Now, when it comes to changing our mind in Photoshop the action for changing your mind could be referred to as undoing that action. Now, if we want to undo that last action that we performed, we can actually come up to the Edit drop down and choose Undo Eraser. It's the very top option there. You can see the keyboard shortcut is Control, Z. So it's a great keyboard shortcut to commit to memory. If I undo that, it brings back this second tooth that I erased. Well, what happens if I want to come over here and undo the erasing of that first tooth? If I hit Undo again, Control, Z, notice what happens. It doesn't undo that first action. What it does is it redoes the second action. So basically, Control Z is cycling back and forth in time one action. Let me come up here, and you can see here, instead of Undo, it actually says Redo Eraser when we brought that tooth back with an undo. Let me go ahead and redo that here and take away both those teeth. And let's talk a little bit about history inside Photoshop. So moving back and forth in history, we only have the ability to undo back one step. But if we want to go back further than one step, what we need to do is step back in history. So if we come up here to the Edit drop down, notice there is a Step Backwards command here, with the keyboard shortcut being Alt, Control, Z. That's a pretty easy one to remember because it only adds the Alt key to the undo keyboard shortcut. So if we Alt, Control, Z, notice what happens. We bring back our tooth. It looks like we've undone it, but we've actually stepped backwards in time. So I'll go ahead and Alt, Control, Z again. And you'll notice that we bring back that first tooth that we erased. Now, if we jump back up to the Edit drop down, you'll notice that if we wanted to redo those actions, now we have a Step Forward command that's available. And that's Shift, Control, Z. So a little bit different keyboard shortcut, but if we perform that action, you can see here that we can move forward in time, performing those actions again here. Now, the history for Photoshop can actually be visually observed in the History panel. And we actually opened up that panel, if you remember, in the previous lesson. So it's right here. Let me go ahead and click on the History panel here. And you can see here that we have a few different actions that have actually been performed since this file was opened. You can see here there's a couple eraser actions. There's a revert action, which we're going to talk about here in just a moment. There's another eraser action. And there is the original open command when I actually opened this file. So you'll notice also up here at the top of the History panel, we have what's referred to as a snapshot. Now, this snapshot was actually created when we first opened this file. So this is going to take us back to this file's original state if we click on it. You can see here, by clicking on it, this little bitty arrow actually appears next to the snapshot. And we have all of our teeth back in their original positions. Now, we can at any time come in here and actually click on any of these history states in the History panel here. You can see here that we can click on this one, when both teeth were gone, that one where just one was gone, this one where I actually reverted the file, and again this other eraser action here. So Photoshop by default will keep track of up to 20 history states. That's what these are referred to, as states of history. So 20 default history states are maintained by Photoshop. Now, we can actually make changes to that if we need to. We can come up here to the Edit drop down and go to the very last option here for Preferences. This is going to open up the Photoshop preferences here. We're going to go to Performance. Now, this is a very big dialog, lots going on here. But if we look up here under the History and Cache area, there's a little option here for History States. Now, what you need to know about this is if you go increasing this too far above 20, it's actually going to begin increasing the amount of RAM that Photoshop is using on your computer. So you want to be really careful. You can slow your computer down a lot by increasing this. Let me go and just drag this up, and you can see that the maximum number of history states that Photoshop can remember is 1,000. I'm going to go ahead and leave that at 20, and let's hit OK. All right. With our history states set at 20, let me go ahead and make some more changes here. Now, let's say that we like this state right here, where the creature only has two teeth missing. But we want to take a look at him with a little bit more work done on his mouth. Maybe we want to erase away the tongue here. So in order to do that, what I'd like to do is discuss the power of snapshots. So this snapshot was created when we first opened this file. Remember, this is going to take us back to the original state here. Now, what I'd like to do is select this history state, the last one where we erased our teeth, and let's come down here to this little Camera button, and lets create a new snapshot. You'll see here that snapshot one was created. We can click on that, and it looks like exactly where we've left off here. Now, if we want to rename that snapshot, all we need to do is double click on its name, sort of like renaming a layer. We'll just call this one minus two teeth. Now, let's go ahead and continue on in our history states here. Let's go ahead and make some more changes here. Let me grab my Eraser tool again, and let's go ahead and just erase away some more teeth. We erase away that one. And then we'll come in here and begin erasing his tongue. Now, I'm performing history actions each time I click and release my eraser. So I'm intentionally creating more than 20 history states here. So we're going to come in and just kind of erase away his tongue. And we just about got it there. All right, so that looks pretty good. Let's go ahead and zoom out on that and look at it. So what we've got now is a new state for our painting here. We've performed lots of actions since our last snapshot. And let's say that maybe we actually want to take a snapshot here. So taking snapshots is very similar to actually taking pictures of your work with a camera. So these pictures are going to remember this state at which you actually took the snapshot. So now that we have three snapshots here, we can actually go back and forth between them and actually compare and contrast those different snapshots. Now remember, if we hadn't created this minus two teeth snapshot and we had performed more than 20 actions, we would only be able to cycle back and forth between our last action, which got us to here, and the original here. So you can see here how the History panel could be very useful in actually managing your states of history and actually creating snapshots. Now, let's say that we actually wanted to work additionally on this creature from this point on. Maybe we want to repaint his mouth. So what we could do is actually right click on this last snapshot, and we could say New Document here. Now, notice what happens. We've created a new document based on that last snapshot. Now, if I jump over here to the Layers panel, you can see here that that snapshot maintained all of the layers that were originally in that file, and we've created a new file based on that. So at this point, we could come over here and bounce back to this file. And let's say, OK, now we just want to change this file back to its original state. Let's jump up here and go to File, and choose Revert. Notice keyboard shortcut F12 set to revert. So if we revert, we're actually going to change this back to the way it was the last time it was saved. And now we can actually carry on with our snapshot document over here and work on his mouth and then save a copy of that file. All right, so in this lesson, we've learned about the importance of undos and history inside our digital paintings. Let's go ahead and move on at this point. And in the next lesson, we're going to learn about how we can target specific pixels in our images by selecting them.
In this collection of lessons we will learn basic terms, definitions and workflows for digital painting in Photoshop CS5. We’ll start off by covering how to create and save new documents as well as how we can navigate around inside them. We'll then take a look at two of the most basic tools for digital painting being the brush tool and eraser tool so you begin creating artwork right away. After that, you’ll learn about several other features such as layers, selections and masks that will add a new dimension to your digital painting experience. And to wrap up this project, we'll go over one possible workflow for painting a digital image.
Introduction and project overview
1

Introduction and project overview

 
01:27
Creating and navigating documents
2

Creating and navigating documents

 
13:22
The basic tools for painting
3

The basic tools for painting

 
11:39
Choosing and mixing colors
4

Choosing and mixing colors

 
10:00
Understanding photoshop layers
5

Understanding photoshop layers

 
11:35
Undo's and the history panel
6

Undo's and the history panel

 
10:26
Making selections for painting
7

Making selections for painting

 
11:18
Understanding masking techniques
8

Understanding masking techniques

 
08:32
Brush dynamics and custom brush presets
9

Brush dynamics and custom brush presets

 
12:16
Sample workflow for digital painting
10

Sample workflow for digital painting

 
06:16