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Finishing the walk cycle
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Joshua Kinney

Pluralsight

Joshua Kinney
In this lesson, we're going to finish blocking in the walk cycle for our character. All right, so in the last lesson, we had worked on the lower body. And now we're ready to start on the upper body. So we're going to just stick with the walk cycle clip. Everything is left from the last lesson. And we're going to turn on the record, so that way we can see everything. And let's go ahead and just kind of take a look at this. It's walking forward, but the upper body has no motion to it. So thinking about walk cycle, we want to start blocking this in, and so what I'm going to do is I'm going to take the body, and we're going to work with it first. Because it's going to control everything else, the arms and everything. Basically what I'm looking for is kind of just a bob in the body itself. So I'm going to go to this first second here, so frame 30, and I'm going to rotate that downward a little bit. And so just to kind of get an idea of what this is going to do, whenever he's stepping forward he's going to be at his lowest point. Now here, about halfway, we're going to rotate that back up. So something like this. So it's going to, he's going to raise up a little bit, and then when he gets down to that last-- on that front leg, that's going to drop down there. So just to take a look at this, that's kind of what it looks like. And then we're going to double that on this side as well. To get started we have our body rotation. So right here at frame 45, we're going to add a key. But let's take the value here. So we'll copy that, and we're going to paste it here. So we get the same thing. Kind of a double looping animation. And then we're going to add another key right here, and we're going to take this key, and we're going to paste that in. Actually, we're not going to take that key, we're going to take this one, because it's at the end. So let's copy this, and let's come in, and let's paste that one. So it should look something like this. And you can make the adjustments to your curves. It's pretty abrupt, but I'm OK with it. It's not too bad, really. And then, once we have that blocked in, we want to come in and start to make some of the secondary motions. So like the arms, whenever they come down, it's going to be a little bit of a drop in that rotation there. So for example, this arm right here at this point it's going to kind of pop down a little bit. This might even pop in a little bit more. So it comes in, that's kind of popping there. But that is actually going to happen probably a little bit later than that. So let's select the hand, and let's move that right about here. And then we also have the upper arm, and the right rotation, let's see, right here. And then we're going to take this key. Actually, let's go right here. Let's add a key for that one and the hand. And then what we'll do is we'll take the value from right here, and we're going to paste that here. So copy, paste. And then we're going to take the upper arm, we'll copy that value, and then we'll paste it here. So what it should look like is it's moving with the body, but then once it hits that lowest point, it's going to jut down a little bit. And then we want it to come back up to that original position. OK. So it's going to look something kind of like this. Now we're not going to get real extravagant with this walk cycle. I would actually probably need to get Delano in here to show you how to do that. He's our animation expert. But you can see how this process, creating a character, breaking it apart into different pieces like this. You can animate it right here, inside of Unity. And so if you're comfortable with animation, the Unity tools are really great. Now, what happens if you want animation, where it's a little more complex than this, if you're looking for something a little bit different. So for example, let's say that you are creating a fighting game, or something like that. There are going to be a lot of different animations for that, and you're not going to be able to get the same look. So for example like the street fighter games on Super Nintendo and things like that. Those were using sprite sheets, and so that's not really going to give us the same kind of animation like we have here. And so what we're going to do a little bit later is I'll show you how to do the sprite animations. We're going to use a simple asset to do that. But what we want to work on right now is we want to work on how we can blend the idle animation, and then going into the walk animation. So that way we can use our keyboard controls, we can move our character, and things like that. So just getting all of that set up. Now in between lessons, if you want you can come in and you can add just a little bit more to this character. To the walk cycle, if you want to add a little bit more weight to it. I would just encourage you to experiment a little bit more. You might even take a look at a walk cycle course that Delano has done. You might even get a few ideas from that on how you could set up your key frames, and kind of apply that information. You could take the eye, you can make it blink a little bit. So just like we had done before at frame one, we could turn that off, and then we'll turn it back on here. And then, actually no, we'll turn that off here. And then like one frame or two frames before you'll turn it off. And then two frames after, we'll turn on and then off again. And so it's something that looks like a Blink. And then here we'll turn it on. Make sure that's on there. Off. There we go. So then if we hit Play, you've got a little bit of a blink when he walks. And you can, again, you can get as elaborate with this walk cycle if you want. But we're not going to spend too much more time on that. That's going to turn this course into a really large course, and we don't really want to do that. OK. So in the next lesson what we're going to take a look at is how we can blend the idle animation with the walk animation. And I'll see you then.
In this series of training we will discuss the major components of working with the 2D features in Unity. We'll start off by learning how to set up a 2D Unity project. Then we'll learn how to properly import and slice our sprites. After that we'll learn how to manipulate sprites by blocking in a simple platform level and also learn the importance of Sorting Layers.

Then we'll jump into the real fun by assembling, parenting and animating a character. By the end of this tutorial, you will have a better understanding of working with Unity's 2D features.
Introduction and project overview
1

Introduction and project overview

 
00:45
Setting up a 2D Unity project
2

Setting up a 2D Unity project

 
13:05
Manipulating sprites
3

Manipulating sprites

 
14:03
Setting up props
4

Setting up props

 
13:35
Slicing the character
5

Slicing the character

 
13:57
Parenting the character
6

Parenting the character

 
09:25
Creating the colliders
7

Creating the colliders

 
11:10
Creating the idle animation
8

Creating the idle animation

 
17:31
Blocking in the walk cycle
9

Blocking in the walk cycle

 
11:50
Finishing the walk cycle
10

Finishing the walk cycle

 
08:06
Setting up the animations
11

Setting up the animations

 
04:49
Scripting the movement
12

Scripting the movement

 
12:55
Using sprite sheets for animation
13

Using sprite sheets for animation

 
07:48